Talks: De què es compon l'univers fosc?

By
Licia Verde, ICREA-ICCUB
Edward W. Kolb
Place
Date
Time
Language
CA
ES
EN
Area
Cosmology
Open to all

The standard cosmological model explains how the universe evolved over time and allows us to reproduce the state of the universe at different times, with the margin of error getting smaller and smaller. For its part, the standard model of particle physics describes subatomic particles and the basic component of matter. Undoubtedly, the physics that describes the subatomic world is closely linked to that which describes the macroscale of the universe.

However, we only know about 5% of the universe: its visible part, planets, stars and galaxies. The remaining 95% is dark and invisible and, of this percentage, 20% is dark matter and 75% dark energy. No experiment has yet succeeded in finding out the nature of dark matter. In this conference we will explain how far we have come in the discoveries and what we hope to find out in the near future.

Licia Verde, cosmologist and theoretical physicist, Laurea degree from the University of Padua and doctorate from the University of Edinburgh. She is currently an ICREA researcher and professor of Physics and Astronomy at the University of Barcelona. His research interests include theoretical cosmology, dark energy and the cosmic microwave background, large-scale structures and the analysis of galaxy studies.

Edward W. Kolb, Known as Rocky Kolb, he is a cosmologist, professor at the University of Chicago and dean of Physical Sciences. He has worked on many aspects of Big Bang cosmology, including baryogenesis, nucleosynthesis and dark matter. He is the author, along with Michael Turner, of the popular textbook The Early Universe for which they received the Dannie Heineman Award for Astrophysics 2010.

Before the conference, between 16:00 and 18:30, a solar observation will take place with special telescopes to celebrate the summer solstice.

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Entrevista amb Licia Verde

Interview
Author
Licia Verde, ICREA-ICCUB
Source
Fundació Catalana per la Recerca i la Innovació, FCRI
Date
Language
CA
Cosmology